By the look of things

Having started life as a picture maker I did as one does and moved to Florence, Italy. There I painted and studied, wrote and read, and when the teacher told us about a work of art that happened to be near by, we closed our books and took a stroll to see the real thing. Times had changed but the thing remained.

To be surrounded by the physical evidence of the past was such a mind-blowing experience and something sorely missed when back in Sweden. Little did I know that the landscape was scattered with physical evidence of the past, I just didn’t know what to look for.

My lack of knowledge in combination with a poorly presented cultural heritage had me occupied with reading up on my local history, whilst developing an alternative way of presenting the past in the landscape in order to share the joy of a present past with others.

A couple of years in I had a solution ready to show the world. Not knowing the first thing about cultural heritage management I went around town pitching the idea to anyone I thought would be able to help me. Until a little old man at the local museum was kind enough to let me in on a secret: he agreed that something had to be done about the presentation in the landscape, but I could be no part of it. When asked why I was told that I needed to a part of the Cultural Heritage Community. He went on to tell me that he himself was an archaeologist, and I if I had been one too, I’d probably have an easier time getting the idea off the ground.

I went straight to the career counsellor, asking what it would take for me to become an archaeologist. Having learned that it took three years in school, and with a university offering a program called the Cultural Heritage Program, there was no need for further persuading. Three years later I had a B.A. in archaeology and a much better understanding of what needed be done about the public presentation of the past in the landscape.

After graduation I started working with various archaeological companies:  making videos for Nya Lödöse in Göteborg, documenting a complete collection of artifacts for Ulf Nässman and Charlotte Fabech for their book about The Sösdala Horsemen and regularly contributing with photos to the excavation of Sandby Borg, all while combining my love for the image together with archaeology in order to offer services in Cultural Heritage Communication.

The time has come to finally put the past in its place and present its story in a way that allows for the small parts to be displayed in the big picture. Stay tuned!

Thank you for reading 🙂

/Daniel

mail@daniellindskog.com

    Education
  • Design for Communication – Chelsea College, London
  • Media Technique – Academedia, Gothenburg
  • Fine Arts – Lorenzo di Medici, Florence
  • Cultural Environment – Linnaeus University, Kalmar

B.A. in Archaeology

Member of SFF